5 Augustus 2006

 



Archives - July 19, 2006                                                                                
                                               Dutch Detention
http://news.sbs.com.au/dateline/index.php?page=transcript&dte=2006-07-19&headlineid=1157                                               
            Now the contentious issue of asylum seekers. Early in the 19th century, an old hulk moored in Sydney Harbour was used to house the new colony's prisoners. The floating prison was a British invention meant to save money and serve as a harsh lesson to those who broke the law. Now, would you believe, prison hulks are making a 21st century comeback in the heart of Europe as a way of holding unwanted immigrants. Here's Nick Lazaredes in the Netherlands.

          22:47 secs        
   
http://203.15.102.143:8080/ramgen/media/8490dl_20060719_dutchdetention.rm

REPORTER: Nick Lazaredes

22 - 2 - 2006

 



Two very Dutch Fires

By Helen Hintjens

Helen Hintjens uses the way the Dutch authorities responded to a school fire in the Hague and one in a detention centre at Schipol airport to comment on the treatment meted out to asylum seekers in the Netherlands.

In fact, a war has been underway in this country for years now; a war against asylum seekers and so-called 'illegals'; people detained and deported because they are not wanted or believed. The policy now is to exclude almost everyone who claims asylum in the country. As Ahmed Pouri of PRIME explains, in the Netherlands, only a few hundred people are given refugee status every year, a tiny fraction of the few who dare apply for asylum in what is now an overtly anti-immigrant climate. People flee to Belgium to marry, to get papers processes, and even flee to the UK to try to avoid being sent back to war zones. Their options are closing down. Most never make it, wherever they go.

3 - 11 - 2005

 


A more complete picture of the Schiphol fire

Pistols pointed at illegals during the disaster.

http://no-racism.net/print/1428/

MSTERDAM . The police kept survivors at gunpoint during the fire in the detention centre at Schiphol-East, during which eleven foreigners lost their lives last week. Those who were freed from their cells were handcuffed and locked up in metal air cages.

Thanks to the dedication of one Securicor security guard who risked her life, by opening up holding cells, and who herself was injured in doing so, more victims were prevented.

This is according to eyewitness reports from K and F wing in telephone conversations with the Volkskrant and with Ahmed Pouri of the refugee organisation Prime.

8 March 2005

 



Stop the Suppression of Women’s Rights

On 8 March 2005 at 13.30 a petition will be presented to the Permanent Parliamentarian Commission for Justice and Integration. At 14.00 an impressive demonstration will begin at Central Station, with hundreds of women dressed in black with white masks, and end at `Het Plein´. Many prominent women will take part in this demonstration.

On International Women’s Day, hundreds of women will take to the streets in solidarity with the female asylum seekers who have experienced sexual violence in their land of origin. Where Dutch victims are permitted to file a complaint for up to 15 years after the crime, these asylum seekers receive only one chance to talk about how they were sexually abused and sometimes persecuted for it. ›››

18 February 2004

 



The Netherlands: Dutch Parliament Passes Strong Measure On Expulsion Of Immigrants

By Breffni O'Rourke

The Dutch parliament has approved a hard-line anti-immigration measure under which tens of thousands of failed asylum-seekers are likely to be expelled. The bill affects even those who have been living in the country for years. Considering that the Netherlands has long been considered one of the most liberal countries in Europe on social issues, the new law seems particularly harsh. Is this a taste of things to come in Western Europe?

Prague, 18 February 2004 (RFE/RL) -- Criticism is growing over a measure adopted in the Dutch Parliament that will allow the forcible expulsion of tens of thousands of failed asylum-seekers. The controversial bill, presented by Immigration Minister Rita Verdonk, passed the lower house of parliament yesterday and now goes to the upper house for final approval.›››

 

 



Iranian Asylum Seekers to Demonstrate in Amsterdam

•In a demonstration planned by the advocacy group PRIME for tomorrow in Amsterdam, thousands will demonstrate against Dutch government's plan to expel 26,000 asylum seekers, including 5,000 Iranians, whose applications have been rejected.

 

 



30-year experiment in multiculturalism a failure?

Posted on: February 17th, 2004 , 9:51pm

Dutch to kick out failed asylum seekers
By Ambrose Evans-Pritchard in Brussels
(Filed: 18/02/2004 )
http://www.etches.net/cgi-bin/talkon/Blah.cgi?b=INews,m=1077083499


The Dutch parliament voted yesterday for Europe 's first mass expulsion of failed asylum seekers, defying a storm of protest from human rights groups.

Children reared in Holland and settled refugees with stable jobs will be uprooted and deported as the centre-Right government attempts to clear the asylum backlog in one "clean sweep".

 
Mehdy Kavousi protests against the proposed laws

 

 

 



1 Hunger Striker Dying, 1 Eating

By William J. Kole
Associated Press Writer AMSTERDAM, Netherlands (AP) -- Exhausted and emaciated, one Iranian called off his hunger strike for residency papers Thursday, but a comrade continued for a 62nd day and was reported near death.

Majid Masseri ended his fast at 31 days after a court ruled earlier in the day that he had no grounds to stay in the Netherlands, where he fled two years ago after being accused by the Tehran government of spying. ›››

 

 



Afghan children in The Hague say Stop the War!

Report on Peace Demonstration in The Hague by Herman de Tollenaere Afghan children say: "Stop the war!" in The Hague at spirited peace demonstration, Sunday, 4 November

While earlier peace demonstrations for the Afghan people in The Netherlands were either organized by big coalitions after national preparation, or purely locally, Sunday, 4 November, saw another type of anti war action. This one, in The Hague, was a spontaneous initiative by local Afghan refugees. Disgusted by the bloody results of the so-called "war against terrorism" of the United States and British governments, they decided at very short notice to march though the city center of The Hague. They got the support of the executive of the Dutch National Platform Against the New War, in which over 200 organizations cooperate, and which organized, eg, a demonstration of 10-20.000 people in Amsterdam. However, this time it was too late for any big publicity or mobilization. It was a breakthrough for The Hague though: there, the mayor [a government appointee like elsewhere in The Netherlands] had a policy of not allowing peace demonstrations. This demonstration broke that ban, though like earlier demonstrations against NATO in the Balkans, police did not allow it to pass the United States embassy or Parliament.›››

13 February 2004  

 



Asylum hunger strikers urged to join forces

13 February 2004   AMSTERDAM — A refugee organisation has advised rejected asylum seekers who wish to start a hunger strike in protest against the government's amnesty and deportation policy to do so as a group to gain better publicity. Hundreds of asylum seekers have indicated they are prepared to start a hunger strike in a last-ditch effort to gain a Dutch residence permit. Refugee organisation Prime is looking for suitable locations, such as churches.

"I tell them that they can get more attention from the media with five or ten people. Preferably with a hundred," Prime chairman Ahmed Pouri said. ›››

13/2/2004

 



ASYLUM HUNGER STRIKERS URGED TO

JOIN FORCES ( Netherlands )


13/2/2004

A refugee organisation has advised rejected asylum seekers who wish to start a hunger strike in protest against the government's amnesty and deportation policy to do so as a group to gain better publicity. Hundreds of asylum seekers have indicated they are prepared to start a hunger strike in a last-ditch effort to gain a Dutch residence permit. Refugee organisation Prime is looking for suitable locations, such as churches. "I tell them that they can get more attention from the media with five or ten people. Preferably with a hundred," Prime chairman Ahmed Pouri said. Pouri also said individual hunger strikers will not achieve anything with isolated, desperate actions, newspaper De Volkskant reported on Friday. The call to join forces came after the government recently gave 2,300 asylum seekers a residence permit in a one-off amnesty, but also announced plans to deport 26,000 others. The policy was devised to clear a backlog in asylum requests lodged with the immigration service IND. ›››

 

 

 

Debate on the situation of Iraqi Kurd refugees by Dutch Parliament

Thursday, June 21, 2001
PRIME
PUK - Bureau for International Relations
Concerning the special debate on the situation of Iraqi Kurd refugees by Dutch Parliament
The summary of the report issued by Dutch Ministry of External Affairs: Country report North-Iraq (11 April 2001)

 

 

 



Fasting Iranians Issue Ultimatum

By William J. Kole
Associated Press Writer

AMSTERDAM, Netherlands (AP) -- ``Death or a green card.'' Delivering that grim ultimatum to the Dutch government, two emaciated Iranians stuck to their hunger strikes Thursday despite a court ruling that one, at least, has no right to stay. Amir Amiry and Majid Masseri, who say they fled persecution in their native Iran, have refused food since the government ordered them expelled as illegal immigrants.

Semiconscious and near death, Amiry has been without food for 62 days; Masseri has been fasting for 31 days, including a 10-day stretch without water. ›››

 

 



Iranians Go on Hunger Strike

By William J. Kole
Associated Press Writer AMSTERDAM, Netherlands (AP) -- Wasting away, they share a crusade and a grim ultimatum: ``death or a green card.'' Amir Amiry and Majid Masseri, who fled persecution in their native Iran, began hunger strikes after the Dutch government ordered their deportation as illegal immigrants two months ago. Today was Amiry's 62nd day without food; Masseri has been fasting for 31 days, including a 10-day stretch earlier this month without water.

The plight of the two, who are semiconscious and nearing death, has kindled debate in the Netherlands about whether the country is abandoning its tradition of taking in the desperate and the downcast. ›››

Feb 27, 2000

 



Riza Karadag - Only Way Out for Kurd Was to Die in Midair

Star LedgerFeb 27, 2000

  Only Way Out for Kurd Was to Die in Midair By Steve Chambers   As the world celebrated the coming of a new millennium, a decidedly darker scene was playing out in a section of The Hague called Painters Quarters.   It featured 30 refugees evicted from temporary housing in the Dutch capital and would end tragically for one of them one month later and 3,600 miles away at Newark International Airport.   "The ambassador asks about the case everyday," said Nevzat Bayazit, the consulate official. "He feels very sad about it. We want to find the family and send the body back to Turkey if that is their wish."   In the Netherlands, where the case has become front-page news, coverage has focused on whether the government failed to accept a worthy asylum seeker.   "This is a very sad case, but there are so many cases here," said Iris Clarkson of the Dutch refugee Council. "We have a lot of rules now to push people out. We have an expression here . . . Fort Europe. It's hard to get in, and once you're in it's hard to win refugee status."   Karadag's case struck a chord in northern Europe, where citizens are still reeling from a similar tragedy.   In August, the decayed bodies of two African boys, ages 14 and 15, were found abroad a flight in Belgium. One carried a letter that pleaded for the youth of their continent. The letter indicated that the boys knew they might not survive the trip but believed they were risking their lives for a better future. ›››

 

 



Expulsion of Iranian Asylum Seekers
from the Netherlands, is the Crisis Over?
by Deljou Abadi

An increasing number of Iranian asylum seekers have sought asylum in the Netherlands. Contrary to popular belief, this increased influx has not been accompanied by an increase in the refugee recognition rate of Iranians in this country. From 1990-1995, Netherlands received sixteen thousand Iranian asylum seekers. and made decisions on close to fifteen thousand of them. Only 17% were recognized as Convention refugees with the lowest rate of 6% in 1995. Another 23% received residence permits on humanitarian grounds1 and approximately 60% were rejected. Prior to 1994, the Netherlands maintained a non-expulsion policy for Iranians who were not given either refugee or humanitarian status. Instead of being deported, they were allowed to stay on a "tolerated status" (gedoogdenstatus).2

 

 



Iranian Refugees' At Risk

 

 


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